Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies

Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies

Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies | Innovet PetYou buy them a dog bed, you treat them to new toys each time you go to the pet store, you buy them the best food that you can afford and read countless articles and social media posts on dog health issues and nutrition.

You’ve got it all covered, right down to their allergy pills, but do you have the one thing you need in the event of an emergency that you may only have minutes to react to and which could save their life?

All dogs, from time to time, will pick something up and eat it that they shouldn’t. If you’re lucky, it’s just some potato chips that they swipe from the edge of the table or that your son or daughter left next to the sofa. Kids and dogs are sometimes cohorts in crimes, but the chocolate.

Oreos that won’t harm your three-year-old can cause severe issues for your dog. Teaching children is important but you can’t reason with a three-year-old. While it is important to teach children so they know as they grow, you’ve got to understand that you can’t be everywhere at once and accidents are going to happen.

Sometimes we are the ones who inadvertently leave things lying around that get our pup in trouble. Perhaps the phone rang and you left your sandwich on the coffee table to run and grab your phone from the kitchen counter, where you left it while making that very sandwich? While you were gone, distracted on the phone, your dog enjoyed your sandwich. A sandwich is a wonderful treat, but what if it had been something else?

While you’re probably upset, maybe even angry, you can’t really blame him, it was delicious and smelled too amazing to pass it up. Dogs are opportunistic creatures. That simply means that when they see their opening, they take it. While this has served them well through the course of evolution. They have survived and thrived as a species due to their ability to adapt and take advantage of situations. You can hardly hold it against them, can you?

It’s fine in this case because a little mayo and some ham aren’t going to cause them any issues besides some gas that you will just as punished with. What if you’d left a chocolate bar? What if you had left a bowl of grapes that are extremely toxic for dogs? Indeed, the outcome could be much worse and the repercussions could cost your pet his life.Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies | Innovet PetAs few as a handful of grapes can cause permanent kidney damage and even kill your dog. It may not even be apparent for a few days they are sick, You’re now in a panic when you walk back and see that the whole chocolate bar is gone and find your dog in the corner, hiding behind the recliner, licking what is left of the wrapper. He’s just doing what his brain tells him to do, take advantage of the gift that was left within his reach. It smelled good, tastes good, and he has no clue that it is bad for him.

Your heart begins to race and you don’t know what you should do. What do you do? You could panic and you might want to cry, but don’t. If you’ve got a STAT! Syringe, you pull it out and you save their life, that’s what you do. You handle it like a boss, empowered with just the right thing that you needed at that very moment.Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies | Innovet PetThis product was made for a dog in the same situation. It was Maggie, Matt’s mother’s dog. Maggie was your typical Labrador Retriever puppy. She was playful, happy, and full of energy. She was also fast.

Despite being a really wonderful pet parent, Matt’s mom found Maggie to be a particular challenge because she was capable of climbing to get to things and she got ahold of things she shouldn’t have on several occasions. Chocolate was one of her favorite things to sneak and it really kept Matt’s mom in a frazzle.

It was for his mother that he made the STAT! Syringe, so that his mom could quickly treat Maggie and get her to vomit on a moment’s notice. He knew it had to be simple and easy to use because his mom would be frightened and in an adrenaline rush when she needed the syringe.

It would need to be very simple. That’s why he designed it with a soft tip that is easy to insert at the side of their mouth. No matter how freaked out you are at that moment, you won’t hurt your dog with it. Just push shove it right in their mouth.

You can’t overdose them on peroxide because it is fool-proof. It has notches on the side that indicate the dog’s weight. You simply have to add a 3% (only this kind) solution of peroxide to the syringe, filled to the line that represents your own dog’s weight.

You use the syringe to give them a dose that will cause them to throw up what they ingested as quickly as possible. Not all things, of course, should be encouraged to come back up though. We’ll go into more detail on that later.

It Works Because It Is So Simple 

Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies | Innovet PetTime is very important when your dog ingests any foreign matter or a food that is toxic, like chocolate. It doesn’t make you a bad pet parent if your dog chews and eats things he shouldn’t.

You can’t watch them 100% of the time, especially if you have other pets or children around. Matt’s mom is one of the best pet parents on the planet. She’s the reason that Matt has grown up loving pets and helping to co-found a company that exists to simply help pets feel better.

Still, she had a hard time keeping an eye on Maggie. So don’t beat yourself up. These things happen. You aren’t a bad pet parent and neither was she. Some puppies and dogs are simply more of a challenge. Maggie was definitely that puppy!

What really matters is how quickly you react and if you are prepared to react. If your dog eats something like chocolate, you’ve got time before it hits their bloodstream because it has to pass into the intestines before the full problem happens.

You’ve got fifteen to twenty minutes, if he had a relatively empty stomach, to beat the chocolate from hitting the small intestines. Once it is there, you definitely have to have a veterinarian involved and your dog is going to get very sick. In fact, he could even die. Even with treatment, it can sometimes be too late.

Now you understand that time is the real foe here. You are battling time and you’ve got to get a squirming puppy to hold still long enough to get peroxide in them to get that toxic stuff up out of that belly. You could also be wrestling with a full-sized dog that is powerful and not happy about peroxide.

The first thing you should do is call the pet poison control hotline at 888-426-4435. They will tell you if it is safe to get your dog to vomit or if they need charcoal instead. They may tell you to do nothing and transport to the vet immediately. They should always be your first step in the process. This line is run by the ASPCA and they are well-trained. 

There are substances that are considered caustic. When they mix with stomach acids, it is not safe to vomit these back up into the throat. Likewise, bones and sharp objects should be left alone and removed by a vet. You can do more harm than good. Call that number and find out what you should do.

If they tell you to induce vomiting, you’ll have it covered. Getting peroxide down the throat of a squirming puppy, who is mouthing at your hand the entire time is not an easy thing to do. STAT! Syringe makes it as easy as it can be. Pour the correct amount of peroxide into the syringe. Don’t overreact. Remember, you’ve got several minutes.

Take a deep breath, take your dog by the collar or have someone else hold them. Use the soft syringe tip to force the end into the syringe into their mouths and aim it back toward the inside of their cheek. Push the plunger and empty the contents.

You can repeat this process two more times. After the first treatment, wait fifteen minutes. You might take your dog for a walk or take them to the back yard where they will move around. Moving will often help speed the process up. If they have not brought it up in fifteen minutes, repeat the dose as necessary.

Once It Comes Up 

Why We Created the STAT! Syringe for Dog Emergencies | Innovet PetYou’ve done everything correctly and you got them to vomit. Now what? You should still pay a visit to your veterinarian. Call them first. Find out what they say. In many cases, he or she will want to go ahead and administer some follow-up treatment.

Charcoal may be given as a precaution, just to make sure that any tiny amounts are not absorbed by the intestines. Activated charcoal coats the stomach contents, toxins specifically, and prevents the intestines from absorbing them because they are encapsulated in the charcoal and will pass directly out of the body.

Charcoal is often the first treatment option for caustic substances that you cannot risk them vomiting. A veterinarian will administer charcoal but you may also want to keep activated charcoal tablets on hand so that if you have a dog like Maggie, you can also administer that, should the poison helpline tell you to do so.

If your dog has swallowed something sharp, like my own dog once swallowed a box of thumbtacks, you definitely cannot have them vomiting those if you can help it. You want those to stay down and be removed by the vet - a few thousand dollars later. It will often involve a scope being inserted down the esophagus and picking things out one by one, or opening them up and performing a surgical removed from the intestines.

Veterinarians perform these foreign body surgeries regularly. One of the top reasons that veterinarians see dogs is for eating things they shouldn’t have. It’s not just you and your dog, trust us; it is a common problem and it can be very serious. It can also be no big deal if you handle it quickly and appropriately.

When you are empowered with the right tool to do the job, you’ll find that you can confidently act appropriately and expeditiously to save your dog’s life. You’ll also be saving yourself anywhere from $800 to $7000 dollars, depending on the intervention that may be necessary on their part.

If surgery is performed, you can expect that your dog will be out of commission for quite a while too. He’ll have an incision and be very sore for a while. He’ll come home with a cone on his head and staples in his belly. He may also have ongoing permanent damage to his kidneys and/or liver.

Puppy-Proof Your Home First 

When you bring a puppy home, pick things up off the floor. Remove power cords, tape them down under rugs or place them in special sheaths that are made to hide them from children and pets.

Place all food items in a cupboard that closes and latches, so it cannot be pried open by tiny paws. The kitchen counter is not as safe as you may think it is. Fruit should be removed from the kitchen table because not all things, as you see with grapes, are safe for pets.

During the holiday season, poinsettias are highly toxic to pets, yet they are a Christmas season favorite. These should not be anywhere that your puppy can get near them. Don’t keep them in the yard if your dog every is unattended in that same area.

You see, it isn’t just foods that they eat, it can be houseplants. Puppies, like Maggie, will often eat anything. Take my hound puppy, who ate the box of tacks right off the top of my desk. He jumped into my office chair so he could see out the window. I can’t begin to imagine what he was attracted to them, but he ate sharp tacks with plastic heads. Who would have guessed? Those types of things stay in drawers now!

Why Does Peroxide Work? 

Peroxide is always the ‘go-to’ ingredient that helps to induce vomiting in dogs. Don’t do this for cats! This is something that should ONLY be used for dogs!

When it is used properly, peroxide is completely safe. It is important, however, that you only use a 3% solution. More highly concentrated forms could upset the lining of the stomach and cause damage to the said lining.

When used properly, it will not cause any harm to your dog and they will endure no long-term effects from the peroxide. Peroxide has been considered the safety standard to induce vomiting for many years and is often recommended by the veterinary community at large.

The bottom line is that Matt wanted to create a product that would be safe, effective, and simple for his mom to use. He wanted Maggie to be safe. Matt set out to create a simple solution to a large-scale problem -- dogs that eat things that they shouldn’t. He created a product that fits with Innovet’s mission for being safe and natural. It’s also perfect because it is inexpensive.

As a matter of fact, this product, under $15, could save you hundreds or even thousands of dollars in emergency veterinary surgeries and visits. These simple solutions save people money that makes it possible for them to be pet owners in the first place. The more affordable it is to have a pet and take care of them, the more likely it is that people will rescue more pets from shelters -- a big deal to Matt and Dave, co-founders of Innovet.

[Text Wrapping Break]They make it part of their mission to help people treat pets that are traditionally hard to treat. That includes the puppy that eats anything not nailed down, like Maggie. Sometimes it means thinking outside of the box to make it easier for pet parents to act quickly, to save a life.

In this case, they’ve hit the mark with Stat! Syringes and you need one in your kitchen drawer, get extras so you have them wherever you may need them and you can pre-fill them so they are ready to go. Going on vacation with your dog? Put one in the glovebox, pack one in a bag. Be prepared with a first aid kit and your pet will thank you with a lifetime of love.

Next article Why Is My Dog Vomiting Blood? - Dog Care Guide

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